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Quarry proposals gain environmental approval from EPA Board

01 July 2011

Two separate proposals to operate quarries in southern Tasmania have gained environmental approval from the Board of Tasmania’s Environment Protection Authority (EPA).

The Chair of the EPA Board John Ramsay said both proposals received significant public interest and both proponents had shown their proposal could be developed and managed in an environmentally acceptable manner.

Hazell Bros Group Pty Ltd submitted a proposal for a quarry site to be located adjacent to Spences Hill near Dysart and accessed via Harbach’s Road.

The proposal involves the extraction and processing of dolerite rock to produce up to 300,000m3 per year of aggregates for road works and other construction activities. Occasional blasting will be required.

“The separation distance to residences from the quarry is much greater that the acceptable minimum standard and the quarry design and proposed management will further reduce the potential for impact on residents,” Mr Ramsay said.

Mr Ramsay said the EPA gave particular consideration to the potential for traffic to and from the quarry to cause a noise nuisance. Special conditions will apply to transportation operations and a further noise survey will be required if the development proceeds.

During the public consultation period, 90 public representations were received.

The EPA Board’s environmental assessment including the conditions that must be included in any permit, have been forwarded to the Southern Midlands Council. The Council will review the planning considerations before deciding whether a permit is to be granted.

A proposal to resurrect a quarry operation at Lachlan, near New Norfolk, has also gained environmental approval from the EPA Board.

MSD Constructions Pty Ltd put forward a proposal to operate a quarry on Lachlan Road. The proposal involves extracting, processing and quarry up to 20,000 cubic metres of dolerite per annum.

“Given the proximity of neighbouring properties, officers supporting the EPA have carefully examined the modelled and recorded noise levels from the proposed crusher,” Mr Ramsay said.

“The EPA has also assessed possible dust and vibration impacts, and is satisfied that all these issues can be managed satisfactorily through commitments and proposed permit conditions.”

During the public consultation period, 24 public representations were received.

Mr Ramsay said that the Board’s Environmental Assessment Report had drawn on expertise from specialist officers supporting the EPA as well as consultation with other agencies. He said issues raised by the public had also been considered.

The EPA Board’s environmental assessment including the conditions that must be included in any permit, have been forwarded to the Derwent Valley Council. The Council will review the planning considerations before deciding whether a permit is to be granted.

Both decisions by the EPA Board can be viewed under 'Completed Assessments for 2010-11' on the EPA website